Category Archives: Lectures

March 2016

Sense about science logo with the words Sense About Science, Science and evidence in the hands of the public

PLEASE NOTED THE CORRECTED TIME!

“Fixing our Medicine: Why All Clinical Trials Need to be Published”

Lauren Quattrochi, Ph.D.

Wednesday, March 16, 2016, 6:00 PM, SUNY OCC, Whitney Applied Technology Center, Room W101, 4585 West Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse, NY 13215

Co-Sponsored by the Technology Alliance of Central New York

This event is free and open to the public.

Parking
Free parking for this event is available in Lot 13 by SRC Arena, a short walk to the Whitney Applied Technology Center. View a map of the SUNY-OCC Campus here.

About the talk
Only half of all clinical trials globally have reported results. Dr. Quattrochi will describe the current landscape for publication bias and how this lack of clinical trial transparency has shaped our medicine. She will dive into why withheld clinical trial data may hold valuable insight into progressing our medical system by touching on cases where unpublished or poorly published clinical trial data has negatively impacted patients, the medical community and/or fellow pharmaceutical researchers. Thereafter, she will detail how the AllTrials campaign aims to address and rejuvenate scientific data sharing on a global level.

About the presenter
Dr. Lauren Quattrochi is a neuroscientist who guides the campaign for AllTrials USA at Sense About Science USA, a non-profit focused on equipping the public with tools and knowhow to navigate evidence-based research. She specializes in educating the public on breakthrough science, correcting popularized pseudoscience and bringing about awareness on clinical trial transparency in the USA. She earned her doctorate from Brown University in Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology, where she discovered a novel third subtype of photoreceptor.

Sense About Science is on Facebook and Twitter.

January 2016

Astronomical map showing Pluto and Jupiter system

A Big Year For Dwarf Planets: Highlights Of The NASA Missions To Ceres & Pluto

Damian Gregory Allis, Ph.D

Wednesday, January 20, 2016, 7:00 PM, Dewitt Community Library, DCL Friends Room, Shoppingtown Mall, 3649 Erie Blvd. East, Dewitt, NY 13214

This event is free and open to the public.

About the talk
Pluto’s demotion to dwarf planet status suddenly made more people aware of its fellow dwarf planet Ceres in the Asteroid Belt. With Ceres a snapshot of a planet that might have been, and Pluto the most famous member of the Kuiper Belt, both are of special interest to scientists studying the history and complexity of our own Solar System as a way to better understand the many extra-Solar Systems now being discovered by professional and amateur astronomers. This lecture will feature some historical background and as-recent-as-the-web-will-allow views and findings from both the New Horizons and Dawn NASA missions

About the presenter
Damian G. Allis Ph.D. is a Research Professor of Chemistry, Research Fellow with the Forensic and National Security Sciences Institute, bioinformaticist with Aptamatrix, Inc., and High Performance Computing Evangelist, all at Syracuse University. A crazy/overly-optimistic local amateur astronomer, he is a NASA Solar System Ambassador, long-time member of many CNY amateur astronomy clubs, and a founding member and webmaster of CNY Observers (www.cnyo.org). When/because it’s cloudy, he’s also the drummer for a half-dozen local bands. He is always happy to talk shop and can be found and contacted at www.somewhereville.com.

November 2015 Meeting

Len Sharp on Easter Island with Rapa Nui

The Puzzling Moai of Rapa Nui (Easter Island)

Len Sharp, retired earth science teacher

Wednesday, November 18, 2015, 7:00 PM, Dewitt Community Library, DCL Friends Room, Shoppingtown Mall, 3649 Erie Blvd. East, Dewitt, NY 13214

This event is free and open to the public.

About the talk
Rapa Nui (Easter Island) is generally accepted as the most remote permanently populated land area on Earth. It was due to the isolation of Rapa Nui that created the unique culture that developed, especially the 900 giant stone statues called Moai found along its rugged coastlines and Rano Raraku quarries. This lecture will seek to answer the following questions: What were the source and type of rock used to construct the Moai; what kind of tools was used to sculpture the giant statues; how were the statues moved form Rano Raraku to their distant platforms (Ahu); how were the statues placed in their upright positions; and, of course, what purpose did they serve?

About the presenter
Len Sharp had almost 40 years of experience as an earth science teacher in NY public high schools. He is the past president of the Science Teachers Association of NY and National Earth Science Teachers Association. He is the co-author of a national textbook used for high school earth science. He is a past National Science Teachers Association Distinguished Teacher and received a teaching award from then President Bill Clinton in 1995. He currently is involved with continuing science education for adults and seniors.

September 2015

penny-higgins

Women, Science, and Love: No One Cries in the Laboratory (Do They?)

Penny Higgins, Ph.D., Research Associate, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Rochester

Wednesday, September 16, 2015, 7:00 PM, Manlius Library, 1 Arkie Albanese Ave, Manlius, NY

This event is free and open to the public.

About the talk
On June 9th of this year, Nobel Prize winner Sir Tim Hunt explained to the World Conference of Science Journalists what he felt was the problem with women in science. “Three things happen when they are in the lab: you fall in love with them, they fall in love with you, and when you criticise them they cry.” Hunt’s comments are just one example of challenges that women face in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) fields. Even the dominance of men in typical STEM classrooms perpetuates a culture of “Stereotype Threat” which continues to discourage women from pursuing STEM careers. The challenge ahead is to accept that this as a real problem, and then work toward practical solutions where women and men are treated equally within the sciences.

About the presenter
Penny Higgins is a Vertebrate Paleontologist and Geochemist at the University of Rochester. She divides her time among managing the Stable Isotope Ratios in the Environment Analytical Laboratory (SIREAL), teaching, and doing research on ancient episodes of rapid climate change.

Paranormal Investigator Joe Nickell

Joe Nickell at work in his office and laboratory at the Center for Inquiry
Joe Nickell at work in his office and laboratory at the Center for Inquiry

Important parking information

Be advised that Ferrante Quad is fenced off due to construction. Please park in Lot 13 next to the SRC arena and follow the bridge down to Storer Auditorium. For handicapped parking use Lot 2 behind Ferrante Hall. Storer is located on the second floor of Ferrante Hall.

We previously said that Storer was in the Whitney Technology Building, but it is not. It is in Ferrante Hall.

Investigating the Paranormal: Ghosts, Monsters, Miracles, and Other Strange Mysteries

John Edson Sweet Lecture by
Joe Nickell, Ph.D.

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Time: 6:30 PM at the Storer Auditorium, Ferrante Hall, Onondaga Community College

This event is free and open to the public.

CNY Skeptics and TACNY are excited to welcome back paranormal investigator Joe Nickell!

Currently the world’s only full-time, scientific investigator of the paranormal, the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry Senior Research Fellow Joe Nickell will speak about his many past and present investigations into the paranormal, including weeping icons, crop circles, alien abductions, monsters, haunted houses, spontaneous human combustions, and many others. In contrast to many paranormal proponents, who are little more than mystery mongers, or to some skeptics who call themselves “debunkers,” Joe Nickell holds that mysteries should neither be fostered nor dismissed. Instead, they should be carefully investigated with a view toward solving them. He has spent his life trying to do just that—whether the mysteries were paranormal, historical, forensic, or literary

Joe Nickell, Ph.D. (University of Kentucky, 1987), is Senior Research Fellow of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry (CSI)—an international scientific organization—and investigative columnist for Skeptical Inquirer magazine. A former professional stage magician (he was Resident Magician at the Houdini Magical Hall of Fame for three years) and private investigator for a world-famous detective agency, Dr. Nickell taught technical writing for several years at the University of Kentucky before taking the full-time position with CSI at its offices at the Center for Inquiry in Amherst, New York.

Utilizing his varied background, Nickell has become widely known as an investigator of myths and mysteries, frauds, forgeries, and hoaxes. He has been called “the modern Sherlock Holmes,” “the original ghost buster,” and “the real-life Scully” (from “The X-Files” ). He has investigated scores of haunted-house cases, including the Amityville Horror and the Mackenzie House in Toronto, Canada. Nickell was an inspiration for Hilary Swank’s role as a miracle investigator in The Reaping (2007). He is the author of more than twenty books, and regularly appears on TV and radio to discuss his investigations.