May 2016

Photo of Jason Wiles

“Trust Me, I’m a ‘Doctor’”

Professor Reverend Dr(s) Jason R. Wiles, Ph.D., D.Div(x3), D.B.E., D.F.S., FRSB

Wednesday, May 18, 2016, 7:00 PM, Onondaga Free Library, 4840 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse

This event is free and open to the public.

About the talk
Chances are, when an author or speaker prominently displays the title Dr. on the front covers of their books or in promotional materials, they are relying on the honorific to convey some sense of expertise in a particular area, or, in some cases, a general sense of authority. However, most serious academics rarely if ever include their degrees in their bylines. Good skeptics ought to beware prominent displays of credentials, as they are often “earned” in dubious fashion. This talk will highlight unaccredited and spurious “doctorates” offered by diploma mills and profiteering scam schools often operating under curious loopholes in state regulations on religious and other organizations offering honorary “degrees.”

About the presenter
Jason Wiles is a professor in the Biology Department at Syracuse University with additional appointments in the Departments of Earth Sciences and Science Teaching. He does hold earned degrees in biology, geosciences, and science education, but he has also amassed a stack of questionable honorary degrees, which were shockingly easy to obtain. He is usually willing to talk to people who want to learn about evolution, creationism, science policy and pedagogy, and now he offers advice on how in 20 minutes or less, for $30 or less, you too can lay claim to the authority of the title “doctor” without having to learn a single thing!

March 2016

Sense about science logo with the words Sense About Science, Science and evidence in the hands of the public

PLEASE NOTED THE CORRECTED TIME!

“Fixing our Medicine: Why All Clinical Trials Need to be Published”

Lauren Quattrochi, Ph.D.

Wednesday, March 16, 2016, 6:00 PM, SUNY OCC, Whitney Applied Technology Center, Room W101, 4585 West Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse, NY 13215

Co-Sponsored by the Technology Alliance of Central New York

This event is free and open to the public.

Parking
Free parking for this event is available in Lot 13 by SRC Arena, a short walk to the Whitney Applied Technology Center. View a map of the SUNY-OCC Campus here.

About the talk
Only half of all clinical trials globally have reported results. Dr. Quattrochi will describe the current landscape for publication bias and how this lack of clinical trial transparency has shaped our medicine. She will dive into why withheld clinical trial data may hold valuable insight into progressing our medical system by touching on cases where unpublished or poorly published clinical trial data has negatively impacted patients, the medical community and/or fellow pharmaceutical researchers. Thereafter, she will detail how the AllTrials campaign aims to address and rejuvenate scientific data sharing on a global level.

About the presenter
Dr. Lauren Quattrochi is a neuroscientist who guides the campaign for AllTrials USA at Sense About Science USA, a non-profit focused on equipping the public with tools and knowhow to navigate evidence-based research. She specializes in educating the public on breakthrough science, correcting popularized pseudoscience and bringing about awareness on clinical trial transparency in the USA. She earned her doctorate from Brown University in Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology, where she discovered a novel third subtype of photoreceptor.

Sense About Science is on Facebook and Twitter.

January 2016

Astronomical map showing Pluto and Jupiter system

A Big Year For Dwarf Planets: Highlights Of The NASA Missions To Ceres & Pluto

Damian Gregory Allis, Ph.D

Wednesday, January 20, 2016, 7:00 PM, Dewitt Community Library, DCL Friends Room, Shoppingtown Mall, 3649 Erie Blvd. East, Dewitt, NY 13214

This event is free and open to the public.

About the talk
Pluto’s demotion to dwarf planet status suddenly made more people aware of its fellow dwarf planet Ceres in the Asteroid Belt. With Ceres a snapshot of a planet that might have been, and Pluto the most famous member of the Kuiper Belt, both are of special interest to scientists studying the history and complexity of our own Solar System as a way to better understand the many extra-Solar Systems now being discovered by professional and amateur astronomers. This lecture will feature some historical background and as-recent-as-the-web-will-allow views and findings from both the New Horizons and Dawn NASA missions

About the presenter
Damian G. Allis Ph.D. is a Research Professor of Chemistry, Research Fellow with the Forensic and National Security Sciences Institute, bioinformaticist with Aptamatrix, Inc., and High Performance Computing Evangelist, all at Syracuse University. A crazy/overly-optimistic local amateur astronomer, he is a NASA Solar System Ambassador, long-time member of many CNY amateur astronomy clubs, and a founding member and webmaster of CNY Observers (www.cnyo.org). When/because it’s cloudy, he’s also the drummer for a half-dozen local bands. He is always happy to talk shop and can be found and contacted at www.somewhereville.com.